Screen readers

Fixing the Jaws cursor in Firefox

When keyboard access doesn’t work, the Jaws screen reader makes it possible to explore content using simulated mouse movements instead. This function is broken in Firefox, due to changes made (some time ago) in its graphics rendering engine. This post describes a workaround that has proved successful for some.

Using the Web Speech API to simulate CSS Speech support

The CSS Speech properties are intended to give content aural style, in the same way other CSS properties give content visual style. The CSS Speech module is unsupported by browsers, but the Web Speech API can be used to demonstrate something of the way CSS Speech might work in practice.

Time to revisit accesskey?

Many websites provide keyboard shortcuts for common tasks. Keyboard shortcuts are useful things to have, but the way in which they’re provided is often problematic for Windows screen reader users.

Accessibility support for CSS generated content

The CSS before/after pseudo-selectors can be used to insert content into a page. In some situations this technique is a useful thing to do, but how do browsers and screen readers handle the generated content?

Accessible timeout notifications

When a web application has a session timeout, it’s a good idea to warn users about the impending timeout and give them the opportunity to do something about it. It’s therefore important to make sure that all users know when the warning notification appears.

Understanding screen reader interaction modes

Traduction française Windows screen readers have multiple modes of interaction, and depending on the task being carried out they’ll automatically switch to the most appropriate mode. This post explains why Windows screen readers behave the way they do, and how your code can influence that behaviour.