ARIA

Accessible emoji

Emoji help us communicate complex ideas very easily. When used in native apps and applications, emoji are reasonably accessible to screen readers, but on the web we need to do a little more to make sure everyone can understand emoji.

Proposed ARIA password role

Let me ask you a question: Would you enter your password into a password field, if you couldn’t be confident it was protected from being viewed by other people? The answer is probably not, but a proposed ARIA role could put screen reader users in exactly this position.

Using the ARIA application role

Traduction française The ARIA application role changes the way screen readers interact with web content. Several good articles explain (rightly) why the application role should be used with caution, but this post looks at a use case where the application role is used to good effect.

Flexbox & the keyboard navigation disconnect

CSS Flexbox can create a disconnect between the DOM order and visual presentation of content, causing keyboard navigation to break. For this reason, the CSS Flexible Box Layout module warns against resequencing content logic, but asking authors not to use flexbox in this way seems illogical in itself.

Using the aria-owns attribute

When a parent/child relationship is evident on-screen, but it isn’t represented in the DOM, the aria-owns attribute can be used to establish that relationship in the accessibility layer.

Accessible timeout notifications

When a web application has a session timeout, it’s a good idea to warn users about the impending timeout and give them the opportunity to do something about it. It’s therefore important to make sure that all users know when the warning notification appears.